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Antique fully fitted Regency brass inlayed figured rosewood sewing box with original tools 1815

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Reference: Sb524

Description: 
SB524: Rosewood and brass inlaid sewing box in high Regency style circa 1815.
A box veneered in beautifully figured rosewood and inlaid with brass. The design of the inlay is of highly stylized flora, suggesting neoclassical designs hinting at trefoil motifs. The juxtaposition of dark wood with bold brass inlay was popular in the early part of the 19th century. The wood and the bright brass were mutually enhancing. The box retains its original  fully fitted tray covered in yellow paper with gold embossed supplementary lids. There is a set of  eight turned and carved vegetable ivory  spools. 

Origin: UK;  Circa 1815: ; Materials: Rosewood, brass, silk leather vegetable-ivory and bone.

Size: 30. 2 cm wide by 20 cm by 12.5 cm:   11.9 inches wide by   7.9 inches by   4.9 inches.

Condition: good overall original condition; working lock and key; see images

 

SB524: Rosewood and brass inlaid sewing box in high Regency style circa 1815.  A box veneered in beautifully figured rosewood and inlaid with brass. The design of the inlay is of highly stylized flora, suggesting neoclassical designs hinting at trefoil motifs. The juxtaposition of dark wood with bold brass inlay was popular in the early part of the 19th century. The wood and the bright brass were mutually enhancing. The box retains its original  fully fitted tray covered in yellow paper with gold embossed supplementary lids. There is a set of  eight turned and carved vegetable ivory  spools. Enlarge Picture

There are similarities between this box and a slightly later box with mother of pearl inlay point to this box being the work of  R. Dalton , who traded at the  Soho Bazaar.

See:  http://hygra.com/uk/sb/SB557/

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SB524: Rosewood and brass inlaid sewing box in high Regency style circa 1815. A box veneered in beautifully figured rosewood and inlaid with brass. The design of the inlay is of highly stylized flora, suggesting neoclassical designs hinting at trefoil motifs. The juxtaposition of dark wood with bold brass inlay was popular in the early part of the 19th century. The wood and the bright brass were mutually enhancing. The box retains its original  fully fitted tray covered in yellow paper with gold embossed supplementary lids. There is a set of  eight turned and carved vegetable ivory  spools. Enlarge Picture

The Prince Regent (later George IV) commissioned such work for his Royal palaces. This technique, which perfected control of cutting and inlaying, required time and skill and it was very expensive at the time. It is no wonder that such work was popular at a time when excess was rife and style was given supreme social importance.

Inside the lid there is a panel of rushed yellow silk framed by gold embossed maroon coloured leather.  A catch holds the panel in place. There is a document wallet behind it.

 

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The box retains its original  fully fitted tray with gold embossed supplementary lids. There is a set of  eight turned and carved vegetable ivory  spools. These are from the era before cotton and silk was sold on reels.

 

 The box has a period pair of scissors; The handles of the stiletto and hook are bone.

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 The box has a working lock with key.
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 Detail: 

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Such work is known as Dieppe work as it was mostly made by French refugees.

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There is an exquisite turned and carved vegetable ivory  pin cushion. 

Vegetable ivory is the flesh of the ivory nut palm. Phytelpas aequatorialis  is one species..

Vegetable ivory is remarkably dense and like elephant ivory takes a high polish. It is also has a hardness similar to elephant ivory.

see: http://waynesword.palomar.edu/pljan99.htm 

 

 The spindles of the spools are made from bone.

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 Detail of a combined needle case and tape-measure turned in both bone and vegetable ivory

 

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 The silver thimbles are later than the box.

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Inside the lid there is a panel of rushed yellow silk framed by gold embossed maroon coloured leather.  A catch holds the panel in place. There is a document wallet behind it.

Please click on images to enlarge |  slide show  | thumbnail index |

 

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 The box has a period pair of scissors; The handles of the stiletto and hook are bone.

 

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Please click on images to enlarge |  slide show  | thumbnail index |

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 The design of the inlay is of highly stylized flora, suggesting neoclassical designs hinting at palmette and (on the top) acanthus motifs. The juxtaposition of dark wood with bold brass inlay was popular in the early part of the 19th century. The wood and the bright brass were mutually enhancing. The Prince Regent (later George IV) commissioned such work for his Royal palaces. This technique, which perfected control of cutting and inlaying, required time and skill and it was very expensive at the time. It is no wonder that such work was popular at a time when excess was rife and style was given supreme social importance.

 

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All text and images and linked images are 1999-2010 Antigone Clarke and Joseph O'Kelly. If you require any further information on permitted use, or a licence to republish any material, email us at copyright@hygra.com